Currently Browsing: About Functional Alcoholism

5 Reasons to Stop Using Drugs While Pregnant

When you are pregnant, it is important that you watch what you put into your body. Consumption of illegal drugs is dangerous for both the mother and the unborn baby, as these substances can cause miscarriage, low birth weight, premature labor, placental disruption fetal death and even maternal death. These dangers exist, because everything a pregnant woman eats, drinks or takes affects her unborn child. Babies who...

The Myth of Functional Alcoholism

The 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reports that the majority of Americans aged 12 and older actively drink alcohol, and in the 30 days prior to the study almost a quarter of them binge drank (five or more drinks in a single setting). While most people drink, alcohol does not affect everyone in the same way. People often have different tolerance levels, aftereffects (headaches and hangovers) and...

3 Positive Effects of Healing Human Relationships

Addiction ravages relationships. Although National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) research shows that professional treatment boosts chances of achieving sobriety and lowers relapse risk, healing never happens instantaneously. Restoring trust and repairing hearts is a process that takes time—a fact that friends, family members and individuals in early recovery should keep in mind when they feel discouraged or...

Why Is Rehab So Intimidating?

The Psychiatry (Edgmont) journal stated in 2007 that shame and discrimination can motivate addicts to take extreme measures to hide their substance abuse disorder. Many addicts resist admitting to a problem because it implies they now have to do something about it, and for many, entering rehabilitation can be intimidating. Treatment professionals understand the potential intimidation, apprehension, embarrassment and...

Alcoholism’s Common Co-occurring Mental Health Disorders

Mental-health disorders and addiction often go hand in hand. People who suffer from both are said to have co-occurring conditions, also called a Dual Diagnosis. When it comes to getting sober, these individuals face a steep climb; without a doubt, overcoming addiction is more difficult when other complicating factors enter the equation. There is good news, too. Recovery from both conditions is possible. The key is...

What Happens in Treatment?

Professional treatment is one of the most dynamic ways to create a vibrant future. Some payoffs are obvious: if an addiction has ravaged your health, then regaining mental and physical fitness is a tangible result you can expect. However, other perks are more subtle. After days, weeks and months of “doing the next right thing” and walking through treatment, some people look around themselves and are pleasantly...

How to Maintain a Positive Attitude While in Recovery

A positive attitude during and after rehab is an important part of recovery. It can keep you from depression and help you realize that you deserve to lead a happy, drug-free life. Furthermore, it can give you the strength you need to make good choices on a daily basis, and it can constantly strengthen your resolve to remain sober. In other words, to maintain a positive attitude takes determination and regular use of...

Can Alcohol Damage My Memories?

The 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) found that the majority of Americans aged 12 and older actively drink alcohol, and nearly a quarter of Americans engaged in binge drinking in the previous month. When alcohol consumption exceeds the body’s ability to absorb it, people experience drunkenness and increase their risk for physical and mental health issues. Among the many issues associated with...

Alcoholism’s Common Co-Occurring Disorders

Alcohol, which travels the body through the bloodstream, is largely absorbed in the stomach and small intestine, and when the alcohol level exceeds the body’s ability to absorb it, the person becomes drunk. The 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) says more than half of Americans ages 12 and older are active drinkers, and nearly a quarter binge drank in the previous 30 days. While many people can...

The Importance of a Strong Family in Preventing Addiction

No one is immune to the devastating effects of addiction, but strong families have a unique ability to prevent this disease from being passed along from generation to generation. Whether that family is a conventional, biological one, or a group of close friends, people planted into tight-knit communities are more likely to be prevented from becoming addicted and are quicker to get help when it is needed. These...

How Can I Tell If I’m Addicted?

Many ideas explain when drug abuse becomes addiction, so people who use addictive substances find it difficult to determine if they are actually addicts. For example, alcohol is one of the most commonly abused substances, partially because most societies accept its use, so alcoholism is difficult to identify precisely. Sometimes, people who abuse alcohol in high quantities believe that addiction only applies to the...

Should I Get a Second Opinion On My Mental Health Diagnosis?

Getting a second opinion on a mental health diagnosis is becoming more and more popular, and for good reason. Mental health disorders are tough to diagnose. They are ambiguous because they are not detected by a blood test, brain scan or other tangible confirmation. Mental health disorders are diagnosed by symptoms and because of this, there is a great deal of room for error. Individuals may not notice certain...

Can you Be Mentally Addicted to a Substance Without Physical Dependence?

Drug addiction is the result of an emotional and physical dependence on a drug. Some drugs produce greater levels of physical dependence, while others produce emotional dependence only. Opiate drugs, like prescription painkillers, produce both physical dependence on the drug and emotional addiction to the feelings of euphoria the drug produces. No matter the type of habit-forming substance used, there is a potential...

PTSD and Medical Emergencies

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects the brain with both psychological and physiological problems. Medical emergencies can cause PTSD, and they can also trigger symptoms of previous traumas. For instance, a Vietnam veteran might experience flashbacks after a car accident 30 years after his battlefield experiences; someone experiencing a heart attack may suffer from symptoms of PTSD long after the medical...

How Important Is It to Recognize Your Risk Factors for Mental Health Conditions?

The American Psychological Association (APA) defines your mental health as your state of well-being in which you recognize your own abilities, can work productively, cope with life’s stresses and make a contribution to your community. When you are in a positive mental state, you feel good about yourself, your relationships and your ability to meet challenges that come your way in everyday life. Any number of...

Can Improving Interpersonal Communication Skills Help Recovery?

Many addicted individuals have poor communication skills. In fact, undeveloped social skills are often root causes of substance abuse. For example, some people believe that they can only socialize or party when they are intoxicated because using helps them temporarily escape feelings of anxiety and depression. Other individuals may interact with ease under ordinary circumstances, but their ability to connect with...

Should I Get a Second Opinion on My Mental Health Diagnosis?

Getting a second opinion on a mental health diagnosis is becoming more and more popular, and for good reason. Mental health disorders are tough to diagnose; they are ambiguous and cannot be detected by a blood test, brain scan or other objective standard. Because of this problem, mental health disorders are diagnosed by symptoms, which leaves great room for error. In fact, people may not notice certain symptoms or...

What Does It Mean to Be In Recovery?

What is recovery? Is it a destination, goal, method or something entirely different? The term is widely used throughout the healthcare system, but when applied to substance addiction, recovery has specific meaning and measurements. In 2007, The Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment published “What Is Recovery?” that defined it as a “voluntarily maintained lifestyle characterized by sobriety, personal health and...

What Are Behavioral Health Conditions?

The difference between a behavioral health condition and another mental health disorder may be subtle, but some behavioral health conditions require a unique type of treatment. Behavioral health conditions are mental disorders that affect the way people behave, but these issues can be treated through therapy and sometimes medication. A user’s behavior can improve over time, but usually only with professional care....

How Open Discussion of Mental Health Disorders Can Prevent Addiction

The National Alliance on Mental Illness reports that one in four adults experiences mental illness in a given year. That equals over 61 million people. The NAMI also reports that over nine million people have both a mental health problem and an addiction to drugs. Stigmas Associated with Mental Illness Despite their prevalence in the U.S. and other countries, mental health disorders are stigmatized, stereotyped and...

« Previous Entries Next Entries »